Do I Need to Go to Rehab?

Society has created the false premise that addiction isn’t a problem until a person has hit rock bottom. That is just not true. This mindset is what keeps individuals from seeking help to become sober, even when they want or need it.

IF YOUR LIFE OR RELATIONSHIPS ARE NEGATIVELY AFFECTED BY YOUR USE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL, THEN YOU HAVE AN ADDICTION.

Addictions are diagnosed on a spectrum from mild to severe. These eleven criteria combine to create our definition of addiction:

● Lack of control over substance use or life

● Lack of control over substance use or life

● A desire to quit using drugs or alcohol, but an inability to do so

● Going to great lengths to obtain the substance

● Craving the substance

● Failure to uphold one’s responsibilities

● Relationship problems with partners, family, or friends

● Loss of interest in activities or things that used to bring joy

● Using the substance to dangerous levels

● Situations continue to become worse and worse

● Tolerance towards the substance increases

● Withdrawal symptoms if the drug is not used regularly

Regardless of where your addiction disorder ranks on the scale, if you exhibit any of these problems, you need help.

It might be easy to think that a mild diagnosis isn’t a big deal because it could be worse. However, it’s essential to remember that addiction is a chronic, progressive disease. It will get worse without treatment. If you get help before the problem gets out of hand, recovery will be a much easier process.

If your problem is already severe, it is never too late. Treatment options exist for every level of the disease.